HAZMAT HOME- Emotional side effects part2

November 29th, 2018

 I don’t know where to begin to describe the past 11 days. It’s been an epic encounter between chemo and the pathogens of the outside world.

It actually started when my sister Marie came to visit from Vancouver. Although this would be her 4th trip in a few months—to different continents and in very different time zones— the giant heart that beats inside her was committed to coming here, a week after her return from Chile (where she had worked very hard resettling her daughter, son-in-law and granddaughters into a new life there).

She wanted to accompany me to a chemo session, but found out only after her plane ticket was booked that I had had a week off because of a low blood count and scorched hands, and my treatment was now a week later than expected. “Fair enough”, she told me, “I’ll go with you to the appointments with the endocrinologist and to see your oncologist.” And that’s what we did, on the Tuesday.

Marie is a human generator, with energy that seems inexhaustible. It was so good to have her with me on that soggy, cold day when we headed into the city and went from appointments at one hospital, l’Hôtel-Dieu, to others at the CHUM, which is three metro stops away. We were gabbing so much that a couple of times, we found that we had set off in the wrong direction and had to backtrack.

At the pub, when all was still well.

It was the beginning of the week, and we knew that we had the luxury of many quieter days ahead to spend together. But as soon as our pace slowed, as soon as we settled in here, in the house, to talk and catch up, I noticed that Marie was speak-yawning, quite literally. There were all these things she wanted to say, but all her brain seemed to want her to do was yawn. And there were shivers too. She felt cold, she said (well, the house was cool, but Marie walks around in shorts in Vancouver on cold days and never seems bothered). It was as though her body no longer knew what time zone it was in.

The week passed, and then it was Saturday, two days to go before she headed home to the West Coast. We were having friends over because this was a scheduled IKEA-thon:  8 or more floor-to-ceiling bookcases had to be assembled so that we could finally get our cherished books out of cardboard boxes in the basement and up into the living room/library, where they would be close to us.

But, surprise, I never made it out of bed. I woke up sick as a dog, with what was either gastro-enteritis or food poisoning (my money’s on the latter: the thought of that smoked meat grilled cheese sandwich at the pub the night before still makes me feel green around the gills). I spent the day in bed, away from everyone: the fun, the voices, the laughter, the dinner, all of it. And thought non-food-related thoughts. And left my door open so I could listen in on the gregarious chatter.

But of course, a cancer patient is never really sure what’s going on inside their body, and I wondered if maybe something was going wrong with one of my medications. I was so relieved the next morning, a quiet Sunday, to wake up feeling shaky, but much better. Gastro or food poisoning it was!

And then I went to the den, to the giant sectional sofa Marie was camping out on, to see if she was up, and found her unable to speak, with full-on laryngitis, congested breathing, weak and sick as a dog, with a flight home to catch the next day.

Now it was her turn to be sequestered. Simon made that eminently, seriously clear. I was NOT to go near the den and Marie was NOT to leave the lower level she was on. This was to be my first true insight into my vulnerability as a chemo patient, and the havoc it can wreak. Simon wasn’t messing around. I HAD to stay away from whatever was making Marie sick, because as a chemo patient, I’m always immunosuppressed, and there’s no way to know how my body will manage to fight any virulent bug.

Marie slept all day, and recovered just enough, poor thing, to endure the slog to the airport the next day, the rental car return, and the 5-hour flight home (she seems to be doing fine these days). Meanwhile, Simon set to work sterilizing the den: each cushion, pillow, blanket and surface that Marie had touched, using a spray disinfectant and steam. I wasn’t even able to give Marie a hug before she left.

Simon, master disinfector

I suppose this should now be seen as the first test of our household’s HAZMAT response, because just four days after Marie’s departure, on Friday, Christian fell sick with an infection that mirrored Marie’s in many ways. He woke up so congested he struggled to speak and breath. His temperature hovered around 101 F. He was so weak he could barely get up. He was seriously ill.

Realizing what this could mean—his bedroom is next to mine and we share a bathroom—he contacted Lucie, my physician sister-in-law, who set off all of the alarm bells she could: this could be the flu; the flu could be lethal to me, his mother. I could wind up in intensive care. It could kill me. It would be best if Christian left the house. He was to have NO contact whatsoever with me. He was NOT to leave his room (except to use the bathroom across the hall which was now a contamination zone). He was to wear a mask any time food or water was brought to him. Anyone going near him (mostly just poor Simon the house biologist/parasitologist) was to wear a mask, gloves and maybe a lab coat too. Anything taken from Christian was to be washed and rewashed and the gloves were to be thrown out each time.

Simon on the attack

Friday, Christian’s temperature and symptoms were unchanged. Saturday, the same. Sunday, the same. He had soaked through his comforter, blankets, sheets, mattress cover. The minute he stopped taking Advil, his temperature shot up again. By Monday, the tension in the house was getting to me, and Simon’s hyper-vigilance was taking its toll: he was on edge and tired.

Aside from the microscopic parasites that were waging battle inside Christian’s body, I was the source of all of this anguish and anxiety and worry, and of the safety protocols worthy of the WHO (World Health Organization). It was me who was responsible for the tense, mobilized atmosphere in the house. Because of the chemo that has so compromised my ability to fight infection of any kind.

Christian was trapped in his room, isolated from civilization, because it was dangerous to me. And so, he has spent a week in there, watching TV, or online, or staring at the walls, alone, because of me. This is an intensely unwelcome side effect of chemo.

I’ve been feeling this way for days, now, and remembering a situation 6 years ago, when Simon, who lived in an apartment then, caught the super nasty H1N1 virus during Christmas vacation, and fell dramatically ill. I remember that the first thing he did was come home, to his parents’ house. I remember that we settled him in the living room, on the love seat, with blankets and a pillow and a TV table nearby on which we kept fresh tea and cold water, and monitored his temperature (there was one day when it stayed stuck at 104 F and scared us silly). And we were right there next to him, and we put on one DVD after another—many of which he slept through—and though he felt like death warmed over, he had us there.

Christian wound up going to the hospital with his father on Monday, where they waited and waited from 9 am to 10 pm. What is known, at this moment, is that flu (influenza) has been ruled out, and so has pneumonia. This is good news to both Christian and me. Blood was drawn for cultures to be done, and Christian should find out today if it’s a virus or some bacteria raising hell…

Dickson, Rodney; Sickness; Atkinson Art Gallery Collection; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/sickness-66470

I’ve found this past week excruciating. Having us separated from Christian, with all three of us stalking around masked and gloved…It scared me. Illness reared its unwelcome head three times in less than a fortnight, and turned us all into hyper-alert germ fanatics. And the terrible thing is that it was necessary, and that it was on me. I am the antithesis of Typhoid Mary.

I don’t know that I’ve ever felt so disempowered and helpless to do anything to help my own sons. While he was at the hospital on Monday, Christian’s phone battery started to die, so he had to reduce contact to the weakest trickle. The lack of contact was painful to me. Like a connection between us was being stretched beyond bearing. I felt impotent. Useless. And like a giant pain-in-the-ass sickly obstruction.

I have to accept that during periods of contagion at least, I cannot be a mother, nor a caregiver.

Right now, I’m dealing with a bad case of emotional side-effects.

Cairns, Joyce W.; The Wounded Heart; Glasgow Museums; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/the-wounded-heart-83450

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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