RECENT OBSERVATIONS FROM CHEMO BASECAMP: part 1

Base Camp, Mount Everest

Part of the “This is the Moment” series

September 3rd, 2018

  1. It’s quite possible that chemotherapy requires the stamina and fortitude of an expedition to the summit of Everest

That’s how it strikes me. Chemotherapy is a campaign, a mission whose objective is a cure, or healing, or the prolongation of one’s life, or one last straw of hope held tight. And sometimes, it’s a refusal to acknowledge the end. I think that once it has begun, and for the duration, you leave what you knew to be your life, and set yourself up at the foot of that mountain that you must climb, which, like all those books and novels I’ve read about mountaineering, becomes base camp: the place where all of the “teams”— in this case, medical, psychological and scientific, as well as hovering, vigilant, mobilized friends and family—that have entered your life.

On Wednesday, August 22nd, I reached base camp: my chemotherapy treatments finally began. Chemo is that thing that I hoped I would never have to experience (at the beginning of my journey at the CHUM, this still seemed possible: Dr. Richard spoke only of radiation and surgery). Alas, it soon became the only way forward for me.

I know that my mum and other loved ones who don’t know all of the medical activity that precedes the first treatments received by a patient enrolled in a research study, probably shouted: Well, it’s about bloody time!  when things got going.

I’m still finding it hard to unpack that first experience of treatment.

Was I stressed? Well, honestly, no. I do have a prescription for Ativan to help me sleep, and I don’t shy away from taking one of those teeny tiny pills as often as I need at bedtime (if developing a dependency on Ativan is the worst thing that happens to me within the next five years, then I shall throw a party in its honour!).

I headed to the CHUM, with both Simon and Christian just a held-hand away, without so much as a drop of caffeine in my system. There was a two-and-a-half-hour delay at the hospital’s pharmacy—where each patient’s list of tailor-made concoctions is prepared— so my treatment only began at 11:30 am.

My blood pressure was taken over and over during the day and was exemplary, with readings like 116/68, 113/67, 120/70…which should tell you something about my stress levels, and a lot more about the care I received from the nurses and the atmosphere in the unit where I was; and about the profoundly soothing and reassuring effects of having my sons right there with me, through all of it.

My protocol requires that 5 different drugs be infused into my body, which took 6 hours this first time, but which may be shortened in the future, if my body shows that it can endure a faster drip of one of the drugs. But before I could leave, a special infuser (which looks a lot like a water-filled balloon inside a baby bottle) was hooked up to me, and I was sent home with it in a fanny-pack—which I wore in front, high on my waist—so that it could drip, drip, drip, drip its contents into my body for 46 more hours (it was removed, when empty, at a local clinic, and my port-a-cath cleaned out).

North Face, Mount Everest

In mountaineering, the higher the summit, the more unpredictable human physiological responses become. As I sat all of those hours on the 15th floor of the Cancérologie department of the CHUM, and watched fellow patients come and go (getting tea or coffee but mostly just using the washroom), I was reminded of the old photographs of the mountaineers of the twentieth century: people like George Mallory and Edmund Hillary and their teams—their wasted faces, their battle-weariness, their refusal to abandon their quest.

George Mallory, circa 1922

 Others observations this week

2. When your life becomes the punchline

While a guest in the home of wonderful friends a few evenings ago, which ended with us all watching the movie Crazy, Stupid Love together, there was a scene in which Steve Carrell’s character has very recently been told by his wife that she wants a divorce. He’s at his work cubicle, looking forlorn and wrecked. His worried colleague drops in to find out what’s wrong and when Carrell’s character tells him, he laughs with relief and says:

Well, at least it’s not cancer !”

I turn to my son, Simon, who’s sitting next to me and say: “This kind of thing seems to happen all the time now.”

3. A lovely friend posts the following question on her Facebook page:

Would you rather have one wish that you could have immediately or three wishes you could have in 10 years?

Most of the people who responded quickly picked the second choice. I simply commented: “Easiest question in the world for me, isn’t it, P?”

Eventually, some commenters had second thoughts, and opted for the first choice. Still, though we live in a world without magical wishes, I’m stunned by other people’s insouciance—by what they take for granted.

Eduardo Lankes, Fog Clouds, 1905

 

 

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